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Did you hear–Anthem to postpone March 1 rate hike; but how do I save on premiums after that?

03-22-2010 by Colleen King

Now that I’ve heard this from three different sources, I believe it. Because of all the flack from Anthem Blue Cross has received from the impending rate increase on individual health insurance policies. At the request of State Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner Anthem will hold off this current round of increases until May 1. During this time period an outside actuarial firm will come in and review everything to make sure the increase overall complies with state law that requires that a  minimum of 70 cents of each dollar is spend on medical care.


Well wait a minute–shouldn’t the commissioner have required this outside audit/review last November when Anthem filed the proposed rate increases with the state? Why wasn’t this a big deal then? You see, it’s not like this totally came out of nowhere. Rate increases are submitted by all carriers to the Department of Insurance, and they are ‘approved.’ Generally speaking. As it stands now, apparently the DOI can’t decline to approve rates. Oh that’s right, Poizner’s running for Governor. Maybe that was it.


It sounds like maybe this wasn’t reviewed line by line, or they looked at an aggregate compilation of the increases. So what can you do about your premiums as they go up?


Call your agent and see what else is available. Even if you have pre-exsting conditions and can’t change carriers, you often times can downgrade your policy. But be sure it makes sense to do so. If you have an ‘expensive’ condition, it might be worth staying on the more expensive plan to keep your medical costs manageable.

See if it’s less to put family members on other policies. Not everyone may as high a level of coverage. And couples wanting to have children? Many times I put the husband and wife on separate plans because plans that cover maternity are much more expensive, and they don’t both need maternity.

Consider a health savings account eligible (HSA) plan–often these are less expensive and if you’re open to paying for the occasionally office visit they work well. Plus there are tax benefits to having the HSA.

And there are other things to consider, but first and foremost, start with your agent. And if you don’t have one, I’m always around.



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