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Health savings accounts and tax time–how do they go together?

03-10-2010 by Colleen King

When people understand them, many like the idea of health savings accounts. They aren’t for everyone, but no one type of health care coverage is. Otherwise, we’d all have the same plan, and health care reform would have hit by now.


What does a health savings account (HSA) have to do with tax time? Well, if you’ve maxed out all the places you can stash pre-tax money, this is one more place to consider, IF you opened the account before the end of 2009. You have up until April 15th, like you do with IRAs, to make contributions and designate them for 2009.


My tax guy is not a huge fan of HSAs. We have this discussion every year; he’d rather see me put more into retirement over an HSA. But the way I contribute to my HSA makes sense to me. You can look at the maximum amount for the year and drop that in. In 2009 it was $3000 if you had an individual HSA eligible health plan. Or, you could do a monthly automatic bank transfer so the account grows slowly over time. The way I do it, I anticipate what expenses are coming up and deposit accordingly. When I know my annual optometry visit is coming up, I put money in for that. HSA money can also be used for long term care insurance premiums, so I’ll be putting money in for that soon–they’re due AGAIN!


Since most people, especially entrepreneurs and self employed people have higher deductible health plans to save on the premium, to me is makes sense to have a plan that can be used with an HSA because the money you put into an HSA is deductible on your federal tax return. And, at the end of the year it’s not ‘use it or lose it.’ It rolls over, stays with you, until you do need it.


You can use the money for all sort of things, click here for a list of allowable expenses. There are many other details on the ins and outs of HSAs, but I’ll save those for another time. Main thing today, if you have one, and you need a place to stash some money to cut your tax obligation, consult your tax professional and see if this might be one thing to consider.


Lots of banks and credit unions in California offer HSAs. Check out this web site, www.hsainsider.com as a ‘clearing house’ of sorts to see what’s available.


Be well!



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