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What are some key items I need to know when opening a health savings account?

07-04-2010 by Colleen King

In my last article I mentioned the first key point with a health savings account (HSA) that in order to use the money to pay for expenses, the expenses MUST occur after the account has been opened. Not necessarily fully funded because you can deposit money and and reimburse yourself after the fact. You just have to have opened the account prior to incurring the expense. And the account has to be opened after you have the appropriate insurance plan, as a reminder.


Other things to consider when opening an HSA:


* Once account or two? Well, only one name can go on the account. For a married couple or domestic partners, once account may be okay. But if both are over age 55, and they are both on an HSA eligible plan, consider opening separate accounts. The reason is after age 55, people can deposit an extra $1000 per year on top of the $3050 maximum for 2010. If you only have one account, only the person on the account can do that, so consider talking to your tax professional for the best route. I don’t consider an HSA the first place to put money, but if you’ve maxed out all your other pre-tax options and you are looking for another place to put some money that can grow tax FREE, this can be an option.

* Fees–You really have to look at this. If you are like most people and you don’t want to dump a large amount in right off the bat, fees of $3-$10 a month will eat into your principle. Many accounts offer low or no monthly fees. You also want to look and make certain there are no ‘per transaction’ fees.

* Investment options–As your account grows, hopefully, because you’ve been able to put money in it and not had sizable expenses, some people want their money to get some growth. Many accounts offer mutual funds after you reach a certain balance. But be sure you aren’t gambling with the rent money, so to speak.


So these are the main things people have questions about, or don’t know to ask. Many banks, credit unions and others are now offering HSAs. You can go to your regular bank but again, look at the fees in particular. If you want to see what’s available, go to HSAFinder.com. This web site is like a central repository that lists many entities that offer HSAs, and I go there regularly to look.


Remember, an HSA is like most other accounts, in that you can transfer it to another HSA if you find better rates. Just don’t have the old agency give you the check to redeposit, as that might trigger fines and penalties you shouldn’t have to pay.


One last thing–Happy Birthday Mr. Obama–talk about a lonely job right now!




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