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When buying health insurance, let your agent help decide what in your health history is relevant.

2009-06-29 by Colleen King

Health insurance remains one of those things that most people still find confusing. For group health insurance, disclosing your health history helps determine the rates your employer gets. For individual health insurance, it determines not only rates, but whether or not you will even be accepted!




Focusing on individual health insurance, all carriers ask about whether you’ve taken medication, been treated for or had symptoms of anything in the past  ten years. One carrier, it used to be the past twenty years. There’s a rumor that one is going to drop it to the past five years. Whatever the number, talk to your insurance agent about anything you’ve been treated for, because carriers look at things differently than you and I do. I recently did a policy with a nice guy who was on no medication, not under the care of a doctor or anything. When I saw his online application though, he had stopped taking an antidepressant 3 months ago.  He did end up getting approved but at an above standard rate because of this. Why does it matter? He isn’t on anything! This is one of those cases where depending on the carrier, an applicant needed to be off medications between 6-12 months in order to qualify for a standard rate. Recently stopping some medications, they are concerned that you haven’t been off of it long enough and may need to go back on it. Basically, don’t let common sense and logic get in the way of reality.


Another dicey situation is when women have had breast implants. Now, consider this. When you first start working with a health insurance agent, it’s not unusual for them to be someone you found on the internet, pretty much a total stranger. They are going to be asking all sorts of personal questions, and you don’t know them from adam. Women often think they don’t need to disclose their implants, after all, it was cosmetic and insurance didn’t cover them before, so what does it matter? Well, it does. Some carriers, silicone implants are an automatic decline. Others, depending on how long ago they were inserted, will accept you but at an above standard rate because of the high likelihood of someone developing contractures, encapsulation that hardens and causes pain necessitating removal. And the carrier may be on the hook for it. I finally figured out a less direct, more tactful way of asking the question so I run into that ‘surprise’ less often.


I could go on, but I think you get the idea. Even if you think an old health issue is irrelevant, talk to your insurance agent about it when considering making a change. If you don’t disclose and there’s an issue down the line, your policy could be rescinded and new coverage tough to obtain. And if you aren’t comfortable with the agent you are talking to, talk so another one or two. There are tons of us out there, we all want your business but you’re the consumer, so find someone you like dealing with!


Be well!

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Talking about Health Insurance–What’s coinsurance?

2009-06-21 by Colleen King

Here is another term in Health Insurance, both Group Health Insurance and Individual Health Insurance that people don’t always understand. I would have posted this sooner, but it’s been a busy month!




(“Help, I don’t understand!”)


Coinsurance might be easier read with a hyphen; co-insurance. This is one of the three main questions people should ask (in my opinion) in looking at a health insurance plan. You have the deductible, the out of pocket maximum and then that step in the middle, co-insurance. ‘What’s my co-pay’ is a good one too, but not as important as the ‘big figure’ numbers.


Generally the deductible is what you pay before the coverage kicks in. If you have something big hit, the out of pocket maximum, or co-insurance maximum is the part that keeps you from going broke. Once you hit your out of pocket maximum, that is generally all you pay on eligible health care expenses for the remainder of the calendar except for office visit co-pays and prescription drug co-pays, depending on your plan. The key word here being, eligible.


How do you reach your out of pocket maximum? That’s where co-insurance comes in. Once you hit your deductible, then the carrier starts to pay. Co-insurance is what percentage of eligible charges they pay and what percentage you pay. 80/20 used to be pretty common, with the carrier paying the 80% part. Now we are seeing all kinds of splits. There are a few (very few) 90/10 plans, but they are really expensive. In the individual market we mainly have 70/30 plans in California, but now there are 60/40 and even 50/50 plans.


Some people balk at a 60/40 or 50/50 plan–what’s the point in having insurance, they ask. That brings me back to the out of pocket maximum. You may be paying 30, 40 or 50% of the bill, but once you hit the out of pocket maximum the carrier pretty much comes into play at 100%. It’s a matter of how soon do you want the carrier to come into play.


All plans are not created equal. The more you want from a plan, the more it will cost. If you want more coverage sooner, it will cost you more. In reality, you’ll either pay in advance (premium) or you’ll pay at the time you need help (medical bills). So if you can handle more of the expense of health care, buy a plan with a lower premium, especially if you’re basically healthy. There’s no rebate for low utilization if you have a ‘healthy’ year as opposed to a ‘sick’ year.


Be well!

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Oh boy, Junior’s almost out of college–Oops, what do we do about health insurance?

2009-06-04 by Colleen King

It’s getting to be that time of year when the four years of college (or five, or six) is about to wind up. At last. That tuition bill is going to be gone and the kid(s) will be out of the house. Then it occurs to mom and dad (not usually to the new grad) that their young adult can’t stay on their insurance policy any longer.


Carriers allow full time college students to stay on their parents’ coverage until age 23, 24, or even 25. As the hassle with pre-existing conditions continues to increase, some carriers are talking about increasing the age a kid can stay on their parents’ policy, even if they aren’t in college. But we aren’t quite there yet.




This little detail can easily escape everyone since finals and planning for graduation are a lot more interesting. I had this situation come up last year with a family, and there are a couple ways to do it. It was a Friday, college graduation was Saturday, the new grad was turning 24 on Sunday so as of Sunday, she was going to be uninsured and Mom was panicking.


We could have done a regular policy, but since that usually takes 2-4 weeks, the young woman wouldn’t have been covered. Instead, we elected to do a short term health plan. These will vary from state to state, so what I’m relating here pertains specifically to California.  These plans I refer to as ‘accident and illness’ policies. They don’t cover anything routine, they don’t cover pre-existing conditions or maternity, but if you get sick or have an injury you have coverage. And, because it doesn’t cover anything pre-existing the underwriting, or review of the application, is much quicker. We can usually get a response in a couple of days.




So the short term health plan was how we handled it. These can be kept on a month to month basis, up to a maximum of 6 months, and if you’ve not had any claims, you can renew it for up to another six months. These plans are also really useful in situations where you get a new job, you don’t have benefits for the first 90 days of employment and you don’t want to pay the exorbitant cost of COBRA. I’ve used these many times and while they aren’t ideal due to the fact that they are short term, they sure can be a great stop gap. And the carrier I use most, if you go to an emergency room for an injury, the deductible is waived. I wish all policies would do that!


So congratulations, and good luck to the class of 2009!


Be well!


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